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Beauty Tips

Keeping your skin happy and healthy!

Another week has passed and it is time to continue our foray into SKIN! Last week I discussed how to find your skin’s undertones. Knowing whether you have cool, warm or neutral undertones helps determine which foundation/moisture tint will work best with your skin- there is nothing flattering about a cool toned girl wearing a foundation with a yellow base. So follow the tests I laid out and, if you feel the urge to be a rule breaker, eat cheesecake for breakfast.

Now part 2: Keeping your skin happy and healthy!

We are becoming more and more of a health conscious society. Especially when it comes to our cosmetics. Gone are the days when women covered their faces with layer after layer of white lead or face creams loaded with arsenic. I know, it sounds crazy that women used to cover their faces with lead! But it’s true- from the Romans to one of our favs, Queen Elizabeth- lightening one’s complexion with a toxic mixture of egg, powdered eggshells, poppy seeds, white lead, borax and alum was fairly common.

Today we want to know what’s in our products and why. Even if you haven’t done a ton of research, you have a few key-words on your radar of ‘what to avoid.’ I’m going to discuss two of the main offending chemicals and why they should be avoided.

Parabens: Used in foods as well as cosmetics as a preservative. They can be found in shampoos, conditioners, makeup, toothpaste, shaving cream, moisturizers and sunscreens.

Parabens are known to be absorbed by the skin and while some are eliminated through your urinary tract- others are retained in plasma. What is potentially worrisome about this is that parabens have shown up in many breast cancer tumors. While there has not been a direct connection between parabens and health effects- they are worth keeping an eye on.

Phthalates: Used as a plasticizer. They primarily show up in nail polish, synthetic fragrance, hair spray and deodorant.

Links have been made between phthalate blood levels and altered thyroid function, breast cancer, ADHD and decreased motor and mental development. While most of the these studies are observational plasticisers are known to have potentially detrimental effects and thus we should limit our exposure to them.

 

 

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